Journibles. The 17:18 Series.

Handwriting your own copy of the Bible will both minister to your spiritual needs (as you feed on the Word of God, His laws are written on the fleshy tables of your heart – 2 Corinthians 3:3), plus leave a legacy to family members who may not yet know Christ.

A treasure: I’m eagerly waiting for my copies of John and Psalm 119 (from the Journibles 17:18 notebook series) to arrive so I can start on this new project from God.

Biblias, libros y sus diseños

Idea

Have you ever thought writing your own copy of the Scriptures? Have you ever thought being an “scribe” (in the good sense)? Do you love Bible journaling? Do you have a love for paper? This book is worthy of your consideration! This book is right for you!

IMG_5119My father has handwritten four copies of the entire Bible! He is still now on his fifth copy: one for each child. He has written them on notebook sheets and then he sent them to be wired. Oh if he had known this fantastic series of books…!

IMG_5121IMG_5126Reformation Heritage Books, Rob Wynalda and Fullquiver have became real a beautiful idea: writing your own copy of the Holy Scriptures. Certainly, there is a Scriptural reason: Deut 17:18, which gives name to this serie.

Now it shall come about when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself a…

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Lord’s day joy – James Smith

A beautiful prayer from Maria that I wanted to share.

Pilgrim’s Progress revisited - Christiana on the narrow way

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…God came down in the person of the Spirit, on the day of Pentecost, first filling the house, and then the persons of the saints. Thus qualifying his people to testify for him, publish his truth, and conquer their every foe. That Spirit is still in the church — but more of the power and grace of that Spirit is needed by the church, and therefore we should still cry, “O that you would come down!”

God comes down now — and meets his people in their prayer-closets, giving them sensible manifestations of his presence, impressions of his power, and proofs of his love. He comes down into the sanctuary, and makes the place of his feet glorious. Then his word is powerful, devotion is sweet, and the communion of saints is delightful. He comes down into the heart, fills it with joy and peace, makes it his royal…

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A hunger for Him… — vwoods1212

God: can be quite intriguing…. Psalm 42:1-2 (KJV) “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?” As sinners in a sinful world, we get drawn by God to enter relationship with […]

via A hunger for Him… — vwoods1212

A Call to Crucifixion

An encouraging article today that was too good not to share. I love this: “In summary, the following pattern will be observed in the life and ministry of virtually every believer. First, the triumphal entry – the initial excitement and joy of coming to Christ and being called by Him to some aspect of ministry or mission. Next, the crucifixion – total surrender and the refining fire of obstacles and opposition. Then, the resurrection – tremendous blessing and victory for those who faithfully serve Jesus Christ.”

In Christ,
Naomi

Living Truth for Today

“Whoever loses his life for My sake will find it .” Matthew 16:25

By Bill Rudge

What do coming to Christ and a call to ministry have in common with the triumphal entry, the crucifixion and the resurrection?

When someone gives their life to Jesus Christ there is usually great excitement. There is also incredible joy when someone is called by the Lord to go on the mission field or begin a ministry – work with youth, lead a Bible study, do street ministry, start a prison outreach and so on.

The people rejoiced at Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem on what we commemorate as Palm Sunday. They were confident of the impending blessing and victory over their enemies. They anticipated going right from the triumphal entry to the establishment of the messianic kingdom. However, something unexpected – even though Jesus foretold it several times – followed shortly after the…

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Hymn of the day – We’re Marching to Zion

The lyrics to the above are really soul-stirring so I wanted to share:

Come, we that love the Lord,
And let our joys be known;
Join in a song with sweet accord,
And thus surround the throne.

Refrain:
We’re marching to Zion,
Beautiful, beautiful Zion;
We’re marching upward to Zion,
The beautiful city of God.

The sorrows of the mind
Be banished from the place;
Religion never was designed
To make our pleasures less.

Let those refuse to sing,
Who never knew our God;
But children of the heav’nly King
May speak their joys abroad.

The men of grace have found
Glory begun below;
Celestial fruits on earthly ground
From faith and hope may grow.

The hill of Zion yields
A thousand sacred sweets
Before we reach the heav’nly fields,
Or walk the golden streets.

Then let our songs abound,
And every tear be dry;
We’re marching through Immanuel’s ground
To fairer worlds on high.

Site of the day: NationalPrayerBank.com

I have been a beneficiary of NationalPrayerBank.com for over a year now. The faithful prayers of fellow believers were instrumental in helping me maintain faith during recent unemployment, and in giving me the courage to apply for other positions. I came across this article about the site today and wanted to share:

Michala Mesler

For Michala Mesler, 19, a computer offers a window into supplication.

At her family’s home in Fairhope, peering into a screen, she scrolls through petitions posted by the devout from around the world.

A man has cancer; a child is ill; someone has just lost a job. The human drama unfolds.

Pray for me.

The website is the Mesler family’s creation — http://www.nationalprayerbank.com — launched 3 years ago to create a spiritual online community.

The prayer bank, says Mesler, “touches those in need of prayer, but also blesses those who pray.”

“Everyone involved is a volunteer,” says her mother, Marlene Mesler, who explains that the whole family — she, husband Don, and their six children — donate not only their time, but also their various expertises, to furthering the mission.

A son-in-law in Birmingham is the programmer.

The family say they charge nothing, and do not fundraise. The entire enterprise, to participants, is free.

“A lot of people want to minister,” says Marlene Mesler. And those often most isolated — the elderly, the disabled — become “prayer warriors, too” she says.

Michala Mesler, a sophomore at University of Alabama-Birmingham, says the prayer bank has deepened her own sense of faith.

Home-schooled before heading off to college, she is majoring in music technology at UAB, and aspires to be a worship leader.

Merging the old and new seems natural to her.

“Prayer is the same today as it was in the early church,” she says.

“We haven’t done anything to change prayer, but rather to offer a 21st century way to share prayer requests and encouragement.”

Anyone can go to the website and read the exchange of prayers. A prayer request, though, requires creating an account and log-in. They ask that site participants be at least 13 years old.

The list of people who have signed on, says Marlene Mesler, is not shared with any other organization.

When people post a prayer request, it is read by the Meslers and other select volunteers to make sure it is appropriate.

Then it is posted.

The mom-and-pop ministry is growing.

As of mid-July, the site had logged 374,874 prayers.

And the requests —for healing, for financial well-being, for the repair of marriages — keep on coming.

Just this week, a request was posted by a man asking for prayers for a friend: “His needs are salvation, healing from drug and alcohol addiction, and healing for his body.”

So far that request has received 23 prayers in response.

A woman posted: “My children and I will be homeless at the end of the month. We are in extreme danger where we live and I am trying to get my family relocated to a place of safety . . . Our lives are in danger here . . . please pray that God will send relief.”

She has received 40 prayers.

“Please pray for me that I don’t have cancer,” writes another.

The response: 45 prayers.

For a request posted 1/29/11, titled, “Cancer On the Skull,” there are 14 pages, when printed, of prayers listed, culminating on June 5 with this response:

“Thank you to all my prayer friends for praying for healing for my son . . . the last cycle of chemotherapy was completed on last Saturday. The next step is to receive radiation . . . Please continue to pray for complete restoration . . . Luke 1:37: ‘For nothing is impossible with God.’ God’s blessing.”

With a click of the mouse, one can read prayer responses in full, and see how to contact those who have made them.

There are prayer groups, too, including circles of those down on their luck at work or those in prison.

The idea for the prayer bank came when Marlene Mesler was expecting her sixth child — a high-risk pregnancy.

One of her children, then 11, prayed for her health, she says, and gave her a calendar marked with the days of his petitions.

Later, that same son, then in his 20s, cut his hand to the bone and was rushed to the hospital. When members of their church, First Baptist of Fairhope, prayed for his healing, they kept a prayer registry — the church’s custom, she says — and gave it to her.

Those accounts of prayers gave her heart, she says, and she wanted to create the same effect in an on-line community.

Such prayer registries can be powerful tools, says Ryan Smith, First Baptist of Fairhope’s minister to students.

He says that his church’s prayer lists originate at Wednesday night meetings.

Prayers are offered for those who are ill, those in need, Smith says. All those who pray sign a letter that goes out to the person who is suffering.

Smith describes the “glimmer of hope” in the eyes of those who are hurting when they see that others have held them up in prayer.

Their faith, he says, is bolstered by “the encouragement” of friends.

There are parallels in the national prayer bank, he says, where the exchanges take place on a national, even global level.

“When you pray,” says Marlene Mesler, “God releases his resources.”

Downstairs at the Mesler home, away from the computers, there is another kind of keyboard.

Michala Mesler spends time at the grand piano, composing.

“Worship music,” she says, “is what the Lord laid on my heart.”

She has just recorded her first CD, a 10-song album called “The Nations.”

When people open up http://www.nationalprayerbank.com, they can listen to the title track from that album.

“God does answer prayers,” she says.

By Roy Hoffman, Press-Register.

The spiritual legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr

By Joel J. Miller

In the fall of 1956, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave a speech and asked his audience to imagine that the Apostle Paul had penned an epistle to American Christians just as he had done nineteen hundred years before to believers in Rome, Galatia, and Colossae.

What would he say? Since the apostle usually wrote to encourage and convict, what faults might he seek to correct?

According to the imaginary letter that King presented, Paul took particular offense at disunity in the church, including racial division. “You have a white church and you have a Negro church,” he said. “How can such a division exist in the true Body of Christ?” Such divisions are “against everything that the Christian religion stands for.”

One need only consult Paul’s real epistles—Romans, Galatians, and Colossians—to see what King is getting at. Consider this from Colossians 3:9-11: “[Y]ou have put off the old self with its practices and put on the new self, which is being renewed in knowledge after the image of its creator. Here there is not Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free; but Christ is all, and in all.”

Basic Christian doctrine teaches that humans are made in the image and likeness of God. We are all living icons of Christ. While that image was defaced in the Fall and damaged by sin, it is still a fact of our nature, and in Christ this image is “being renewed,” as Paul said.

Communion with both God and our fellow man was sundered in the Fall. Fratricide followed our expulsion from the Garden, and every kind of hatred and division came with it. But as our nature is restored, our communion is reestablished with God as well as man. Ethnic distinctions need no longer divide because “Christ is all, and in all.”

Racism is “against everything that the Christian religion stands for,” as King said, because the Christian faith is about elevating man’s fallen nature and restoring divine and human communion. But racism refuses to see the image of God in another. “The segregator relegates the segregated to the status of a thing,” said King, “rather than elevate him to the status of a person.” The racist does not see Christ in all, only in himself, and it is a false Christ. As a result, the racist misses the grace and goodness that God gives because it manifests in people and communities he spurns.

Martin Luther King Jr. taught one basic fact: that we should esteem all of God’s children regardless of color, that we should honor God’s image wherever and in whomever we find it. As we uphold King’s memory today we should view his task as incomplete as long as we devalue, obscure, or ignore the image in others.

If we cannot see Christ in all, then we will not see Christ at all. King said as much in his close of Paul’s imaginary letter to American Christians: “As John says, ‘God is love’ (1 John 4:8). He who loves is a participant in the being of God. He who hates does not know God.”