10 virtues of the Proverbs 31 woman

From: http://avirtuouswoman.org/10-virtues-of-the-proverbs-31-woman/

Here at A Virtuous Woman, I want to encourage women to serve God in every aspect of their lives. Being a Proverbs 31 woman is not about being “perfect.” It’s about living life with purpose, diligence, forgiveness, and repentance.

THE PROVERBS 31 WOMAN TODAY

Often women believe that Proverbs 31 doesn’t really apply to our modern lives. Here at A Virtuous Woman, we believe that God’s Word stands the test of time. I wrote the 10 Virtues of the Proverbs 31 Woman as the mission statement for A Virtuous Woman, but soon realized that it was more than a mission statement. The 10 Virtues of the Proverbs 31 Woman demonstrates how, as Christian women today, we can all be Proverbs 31 Women.

THE 10 VIRTUES OF THE PROVERBS 31 WOMAN

1. Faith – A Virtuous Woman serves God with all of her heart, mind, and soul. She seeks His will for her life and follows His ways. (Proverbs 31: 26, Proverbs 31: 29 – 31, Matthew 22: 37, John 14: 15, Psalm 119: 15)

2. Marriage – A Virtuous Woman respects her husband. She does him good all the days of her life. She is trustworthy and a helpmeet. (Proverbs 31: 11- 12, Proverbs 31: 23, Proverbs 31: 28, 1 Peter 3, Ephesians 5, Genesis 2: 18)\

3. Mothering – A Virtuous Woman teaches her children the ways of her Father in heaven. She nurtures her children with the love of Christ, disciplines them with care and wisdom, and trains them in the way they should go. (Proverbs 31: 28, Proverbs 31: 26, Proverbs 22: 6, Deuteronomy 6, Luke 18: 16)

4. Health – A Virtuous Woman cares for her body. She prepares healthy food for her family. (Proverbs 31: 14 – 15, Proverbs 31: 17, 1 Corinthians 6: 19, Genesis 1: 29, Daniel 1, Leviticus 11)

5. Service – A Virtuous Woman serves her husband, her family, her friends, and her neighbors with a gentle and loving spirit. She is charitable. (Proverbs 31: 12, Proverbs 31: 15, Proverbs 31: 20, 1 Corinthians 13: 13)

6. Finances – A Virtuous Woman spends money wisely. She is careful to purchase quality items which her family needs. (Proverbs 31: 14, Proverbs 31: 16, Proverbs 31: 18, 1 Timothy 6: 10, Ephesians 5: 23, Deuteronomy 14: 22, Numbers 18: 26)

7. Industry – A Virtuous Woman works willingly with her hands. She sings praises to God and does not grumble while completing her tasks. (Proverbs 31: 13, Proverbs 31: 16, Proverbs 31: 24, Proverbs 31: 31, Philippians 2: 14)

8. Homemaking – A Virtuous Woman is a homemaker. She creates an inviting atmosphere of warmth and love for her family and guests. She uses hospitality to minister to those around her. (Proverbs 31: 15, Proverbs 31: 20 – 22, Proverbs 31: 27, Titus 2: 5, 1 Peter 4: 9, Hebrews 13: 2)

9. Time – A Virtuous Woman uses her time wisely. She works diligently to complete her daily tasks. She does not spend time dwelling on those things that do not please the Lord. (Proverbs 31: 13, Proverbs 31: 19, Proverbs 31: 27, Ecclesiastes 3, Proverbs 16: 9, Philippians 4:8)

10. Beauty – A Virtuous Woman is a woman of worth and beauty. She has the inner beauty that only comes from Christ. She uses her creativity and sense of style to create beauty in her life and the lives of her loved ones. (Proverbs 31: 10Proverbs 31: 21 – 22, Proverbs 31: 24 -25, Isaiah 61: 10, 1 Timothy 2: 9, 1 Peter 3: 1 – 6)

How to stay motivated at home

From: http://avirtuouswoman.org/31-days-calm-stay-motivated-home-day-19/

If you and I are called to the ministry of homemaking and homemaking requires us to stay focused 365 days of the year (minus sick days and vacations), how can we stay motivated without feeling discouraged or burn-out?

It’s easier to be a good homemaker if you feel happy. At least, I’ve found that when I’m feeling discouraged or depressed or tired, it’s just harder to get going in the morning and it’s harder to face the mundane chores day after day.

THE PROVERBS 31 WOMAN

We know that the Proverbs 31 Woman looks well to the ways of her household. I don’t believe that God assigned household chores to us women to ruin our lives. Homemaking should bring us a sense of peace and joy.

But it’s hard to find that peace and joy in homemaking when life feels chaotic.

4 WAYS TO STAY MOTIVATED AT HOME

1. Simplify. We talked about slowing down and saying no to too many outside activities. Simplifying your life really does bring more peace and joy! Less is MORE. We don’t need more stuff. We don’t need more to do. We don’t need more, more, more.

Unfortunately, for most Americans, the mindset is often MORE IS MORE. Cut down on the clutter in your life – whether it be things cluttering your time, your space, your home, your relationship, your walk with Christ. Get rid of the excess things that are dragging you down instead of lifting you up.

2. Make your home pretty. I know, most of us are on tight budgets these days. But making your home pretty doesn’t have to cost a lot. Use your creativity. Scour decorating blogs for ideas on how to turn trash into treasure. Visit flea markets and thrift stores and yard sales if you can’t afford to shop at department stores. And even then, sometimes you can find amazing deals in stores you think you can’t afford to shop in.

I find most of my “pretty” things at stores like Wal-Mart, Big Lots, Hobby Lobby, and Dollar General.

3. Set aside time each week for you. I enjoy spending time on my Project Life albums. Sometimes I like to just spend a couple of hours in the morning {on slow days} to peruse my favorite homemaking blogs for inspiration. I also love hiking and camping. I feel refreshed when I get to spend an afternoon out with my kids on a hike. Maybe you enjoy sewing or painting. Whatever it is that brings you joy, make time for it.

4. Read edifying and inspiring books. Of course, the BEST book to read to help you feel inspired in your ministry at home is the Bible. And I encourage each of you to spend regular time in prayer and study. But reading books on homemaking, mothering, DIY, and more can help give your spirit a little boost when you need it.

You’ll be able to come back to your job at home with a fresh perspective, a happy attitude, and a gratefulness for the many blessings you have.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED AT HOME?

The Believer’s Relationship to the Mosaic Covenant

At the Blue Letter Bible, we consistently receive questions on tithing, on which, if any, of the often “strange” Levitical laws (e.g., Do not weave two kinds of fabric together) apply to the believer today, on when to celebrate Old Testament feast days, et cetera. These are all questions borne out of an inadequate understanding of the agreement made between God and Moses on Mount Sinai.

Properly understanding the covenants and their importance seems to be one of the most eluding pieces of theology for the modern believer. The Mosaic Covenant was directed specifically toward the nation of Israel and was concerned in its chiefest aspect with Israel’s inheritance of and blessing in the land of Canaan—the Promised Land. The laws that attended this covenant, while revealing God’s desire for this nation to be set apart from all others as an example, do not necessarily give us any perfect basis for understanding morality. This may seem to be a strange statement. But we ask you to consider the following points.

Much of the time when people discuss the “Law,” they are thinking primarily of the Decalogue (the Ten Commandments). However, the Law, (i.e., the Mosaic Covenant) contained several hundreds of commandments. Many of which today are not even possible to follow, due to the lack of a Jewish Temple. Yet, biblical morality is not affected by this situation. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus seemingly expanded the understanding of the Ten Commandments. Rather than just stating that we should not murder, He told us that if we called our brother a “fool,” it was the same as committing murder. So the Ten Commandments were not all encompassing as to morality.

The real question then presents itself, “What responsibility does the believer owe to the Mosaic Covenant?”

While the law is good (1 Tim 1:8), it is unable to justify (Gal 2:16). Under the “New Covenant,” Christ is our fulfillment of the law (Mat 5:17). Therefore, as to the question of what responsibility does the New Covenant believer owe to the Mosaic Covenant, the answer is “nothing” for the purposes of salvation (Gal 3:1-3). Some of the standards iterated from God through Moses upon Sinai were directed at the nation of Israel simply as the terms of a contract for possession of a certain portion of land. Deuteronomy 28 makes clear the stipulations of this covenant; essentially God would bless Israel for obedience by granting great prosperity in the land but curse Israel for its disobedience with all manner of catastrophe culminating in the loss of Canaan. Despite God’s long-suffering, Israel fails to uphold her portion of the covenant and reaps the curses God promised — climaxing in the Babylonian capture in the Seventh Century B.C.

The Law (both the covenantal and the universal, Ten Commandment aspects of it) now serves to lead mankind to understand his corruption. Just as Israel, a nation born of the fruit of God’s own grace, could not stand under the righteous requirements of the Mosaic Law, neither can any man stand under the condemnation of God’s universal requirement—absolute obedience of mind and action. Paul speaks of the Law as one who leads us step by step to grace, for it points out our dire need of such (cf. Galatians 3:23ff). And having taken hold of grace by faith, the believer no longer heeds the condemning beckon of the Law (cf. Romans). So then, is there any reason to look to the Levitical laws for ethical guidance unto righteousness? No — for their service now is to guide men to Christ (Galatians 3:24).

What then? Is this freedom merely for the believing Gentile? Or does the believer of Jewish decent likewise bear this liberty? As certainly as the Jewish believer holds to Christ is his freedom from the Mosaic Law assured. The chief redemptive aspect of the Mosaic Covenant has been fulfilled by Christ. The blood of bulls and goats is useless and perfectly replaced by the sacrifice of the one Son of God Himself; to return to the Mosaic Law is to deny the sacrifice of Christ. This was the impetus driving the apostles as they stood against the Judaizers (those who were requiring believers in Christ to bear up under the Mosaic Law) proclaiming, “Beware the dogs, the evildoers, the mutilation.”

Where then do we find our Christian ethic? Quite simply, in Christ’s words: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength and you shall love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:30-31). If we follow Christ’s command, we cannot break any aspect of the Ten Commandments, nor any aspect of God’s morality. And we find extrapolation of these ultimate commands in all the writings of the New Testament authors. That is our ethic—and it is borne by our faith in and love for Christ rather than from our fear of breaking the law.

This post was taken from: https://www.blueletterbible.org/faq/mosaic_cov.cfm

I trust you found it edifying.

Learning to speak words of life – Gerry and Vicky’s story

Marriage isn’t easy. But when your spouse doesn’t share your views of God, it can bring additional strife to the relationship. In the article below, Gerry and Vicki describe how God not only transformed their marriage but also turned this husband and wife into a dynamic missionary team.

I could really relate to their story as I am also married (happily, thankfully) to an unbeliever who at times pushes back but is ever so surely being drawn to God:

Learning to speak words of life–Gerry & Vicki’s Story

Sex is a lot more than fun – Elisabeth Elliot

Elisabeth Elliot

The following was written many years ago by Elisabeth Elliot Gren, a faithful Christian lady and writer who died in June 2015. It has been out of print for many years but, because of their love for our Savior and their love for people of all ages, Elisabeth and her husband Lars Gren have agreed to make it available on the internet without cost, provided no changes are made and there is no charge made to anyone receiving a copy.

This booklet was written for children ages 12-15, and when distributed by adults, should be directed to children of that age.

http://www.elisabethelliot.org/SIALMTF.pdf

Hymn of the day – We’re Marching to Zion

The lyrics to the above are really soul-stirring so I wanted to share:

Come, we that love the Lord,
And let our joys be known;
Join in a song with sweet accord,
And thus surround the throne.

Refrain:
We’re marching to Zion,
Beautiful, beautiful Zion;
We’re marching upward to Zion,
The beautiful city of God.

The sorrows of the mind
Be banished from the place;
Religion never was designed
To make our pleasures less.

Let those refuse to sing,
Who never knew our God;
But children of the heav’nly King
May speak their joys abroad.

The men of grace have found
Glory begun below;
Celestial fruits on earthly ground
From faith and hope may grow.

The hill of Zion yields
A thousand sacred sweets
Before we reach the heav’nly fields,
Or walk the golden streets.

Then let our songs abound,
And every tear be dry;
We’re marching through Immanuel’s ground
To fairer worlds on high.